An introduction to Debian networking setup

Posted by Steve on Sun 25 Sep 2005 at 13:32

Under Debian networking is pretty comparable to other distributions of GNU/Linux, especially in areas such as DNS setup. However if you're new to the distribution you might not know where things are set. This brief introduction to networking will show you how it works.

Most likely there are only four things you will care about:

  • Setting up your hostname
  • Setting up DNS.
  • Setting up your IP address.
  • Setting your default gateway.
Setting your hostname

Setting up your hostname upon a Debian installation is very straightforward. You can directly query, or set, the hostname with the hostname command.

As an user you can see your current hostname with:

skx@lappy:~$ /bin/hostname 
lappy

To set the hostname directly you can become root and run:

/bin/hostname newname

When your system boots it will automatically read the hostname from the file /etc/hostname - so if you wish to make a permanent change then you should edit that file, and your change will then be made at bootup time automatically.

Setting up DNS

When it comes to DNS setup Debian doesn't differ from other distributions. You can add hostname and IP addresses to the file /etc/hosts for static lokups.

To cause your machine to consult with a particular server for name lookups you simply add their addresses to /etc/resolv.conf.

For example a machine which should perform lookups from the DNS server at IP address 192.168.1.1 would have a resolv.conf file looking like this:

search my.flat
nameserver 192.168.1.1

(Here the search my.flat causes lookups of hostnames to have my.flat appended to them. So lappy would be looked up as lappy.my.flat)

Setting up your IP address.

The IP addresses associated with any network cards you might have are read from the file /etc/network/interfaces. This file has documentation you can read with:

man interfaces

A sample entry for a machine with a static address would look something like this:

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
 address 192.168.1.90
 gateway 192.168.1.1
 netmask 255.255.255.0
 network 192.168.1.0
 broadcast 192.168.1.255

Here we've setup the IP addresss (192.168.1.90), the default gateway (192.168.1.1), and the netmask.

For a machine running DHCP the setup would look much simpler:

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface - use DHCP to find our address
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp

(If you're using a DHCP based setup you must have a DHCP client package installed - usually one of pump or dhcp-client.)

If you make changes to this file you can cause them to take effect by running:

/etc/init.d/networking restart
Setting your default gateway.

If you read the previous section then you'll see that the default route for a host with a static IP address can be set in /etc/network/interfaces.

If you wish to view your current default route/gateway then you can run:

lappy:~# netstat -nr
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags   MSS Window  irtt Iface
192.168.1.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U         0 0          0 eth0
0.0.0.0         192.168.1.1     0.0.0.0         UG        0 0          0 eth0

Alternatively you can use the route command:

lappy:~# /sbin/route
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.1.0     *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth0
default         router          0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth0

(Here the see the hostname router instead of the IP address 192.168.1.1 - to avoid that run "/sbin/route -n").

To change your default route you must first remove the current one:

/sbin/route del default gw 192.168.1.1

Once this has done you'll have no gateway and be unable to talk to non-local hosts.

Add the new route with :

/sbin/route add default gw 192.168.1.100

 

 


Posted by rbochan (24.92.xx.xx) on Sun 25 Sep 2005 at 13:54
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You could also use the etherconf package and let debconf manage your network setup. It makes for easy switching too.

...Rob
The American Dream isn't an SUV and a house in the suburbs; it's Don't Tread On Me.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by wbachnik (213.150.xx.xx) on Sun 25 Sep 2005 at 16:20
When I changed hostname of my machine manually, I also had to change entries in /etc/hosts and /etc/exim.conf files. Without that X server and Exim (probably some other apps as well) would complain.

--
Wiktor

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Sep 2005 at 21:16
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Yes that is certainly something to consider. If you're running any networking services you might have hard-coded references to your old hostname/IP address.

We discussed this briefly when talking about migrating to a new machine.

Steve
--

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (84.65.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Sep 2005 at 21:12
I found that just changing /etc/resolv.conf didn't work. It rewrites itself each time you reboot the computer. Therefore, you need to do something else to change the nameservers. (I never looked into it too much, so I'm not sure how!)

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Sep 2005 at 21:15
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That shouldn't spontaneously occur - unless perhaps you're running a DHCP setup.

If you are you should examine your dhcp-client / pump / whatever settings to stop this from happening ...

Steve
--

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Posted by Anonymous (84.65.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Sep 2005 at 22:18
Well, I'm a bit useless when it comes to this sort of thing, so maybe you can help me!

This happens on a fresh install of Sarge, no packages apart from the ones it installs straight away. I change /etc/resolv.conf (because the router I have to use doesn't like Linux for some bizzare reason, despite it using Linux firmware!), and it changes itself back to the wrong DNS. I've tried it with both an automatically assigned IP and a static IP, with no change.

Any help would be appreciated!

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Demitsu (84.176.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Sep 2005 at 23:00
My DHCP experience is pretty limited, but if I remember correctly, DNS is also broadcast by DHCP. Assigning your computer's IP statically (not using DHCP, thus additionally skipping the resolv.conf rewrite) might help. Of course, this workaround implies you don't have to rely on DHCP at any cost.

There absolutely *must* be a better way to solve this, so you might be better off waiting for someone more knowledgeable to read your comment than implementing above mentioned workaround. ;-)

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (62.202.xx.xx) on Tue 27 Sep 2005 at 09:06
Check you don't have any process like "dhclient" which is still running... or any DHCP client. If you use dhcp and the use a static IP address, you often have the dhclient process running in the background and it will update your resolv.conf.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Mike_W (84.66.xx.xx) on Tue 27 Sep 2005 at 16:55
I checked through all the processes, and couldn't find anything similar to dhclient. However, assuming that is what is causing the problem, I thought changing /etc/dhclient.conf would help. Unforunately, I have no idea how to edit it! (At the moment, it is all commented out)

Thanks for the help so far.

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Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Tue 27 Sep 2005 at 17:28
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If you don't need the package why not simply remove it?

"dpkg --purge packageName", should do the job for you. (The package name might be dhcp-client, dhcp3-client, pump, or something else. You can see which package owns the file by running "dpkg --search /etc/dhclient.conf")

(The later comment about resolvconf seems plausible too ..)

Steve
--

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (194.108.xx.xx) on Tue 27 Sep 2005 at 16:46
The "problem" is certainly package resolvconf which manages /etc/resolv.conf automagically

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (200.96.xx.xx) on Wed 28 Sep 2005 at 05:43
I had the exact same problem.
After every DHCP lease expiry, dhclient will request a renew and then update your /etc/resolv.conf.
Good news is you can tell it how the update should be done.
Putting the directive
prepend domain-name "my-home.com"
in /etc/dhclient.conf will force dhclient to insert
search my-home.com
into /etc/resolv.conf the next time it updates that file.

Good luck!

Alexandre Ilha

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Posted by dkg (72.43.xx.xx) on Wed 28 Sep 2005 at 21:09
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actually, resolvconf is the solution to this problem, not the cause.

The problem is that aquiring a dynamic configuration via DHCP legitimately might suggest changes to /etc/resolv.conf. without the resolvconf package installed the dhcp client program will just overwrite the contents of /etc/resolv.conf in its entirety. Problems immediately arise if there are, say, two clients capable of acquiring (or generating) networking configuration information. does each one wipe out the other one's data? and if you edit the file by hand, that's a third change -- how should the programs cope with this?

with resolvconf installed, you can add whatever permanent settings you need into /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base (or .../head or .../tail, if you need the lines to be explicitly at the top or bottom of the generated /etc/resolv.conf), and the file will be managed programmatically. when a new program has resolver information, it tells resolvconf, which then regenerates /etc/resolv.conf appropriately.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (141.201.xx.xx) on Tue 4 Oct 2005 at 21:03
Rather than to /etc/resolvconf/blah I would suggest to add the entries directly to /etc/network/interfaces:

dns-nameservers 1.2.3.4 5.6.7.8
dns-search my.flat

ifup automagically transfers these settings to resolv.conf when the interface is then brought up.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by dkg (24.184.xx.xx) on Tue 4 Oct 2005 at 22:08
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Yep. this is a good suggestion!

If you need the settings to be always available, yer better off putting it in /etc/resolvconf/base, but if you only want that setting to be available when a particular interface is up, you should certainly put that setting in /etc/network/interfaces.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (82.173.xx.xx) on Fri 28 Oct 2005 at 13:08
maybe is "problem" is NOT resolvconf

if the internet interface is using dhcp-client and you better use dhcp3-client and dhcp3-server, then you are prepaired for a ddns setup.

you need to do this,
apt-get remove --purge dhcp-client
apt-get install dhcp3-client
in /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf

# /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf


supersede domain-name "setyourdomain.here.com";
prepend domain-name-servers 127.0.0.1;

thats all.
no need for resolvconf

i used it and removed it.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (192.234.xx.xx) on Tue 14 Mar 2006 at 13:52
Yes this is the solution.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (82.43.xx.xx) on Wed 28 Sep 2005 at 06:40
Try removing resolvconf

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by dkg (72.43.xx.xx) on Wed 28 Sep 2005 at 21:10
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or rather, try adding resolvconf, but make your changes to /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base instead of /etc/resolv.conf directly. as i mentioned above, this is the kind of problem that resolvconf is designed to handle.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Mike_W (84.64.xx.xx) on Sat 1 Oct 2005 at 12:39
I've installed resolvconf and set it accordingly, and it seems to be working perfectly now! Thanks very much for the advice.

Mike

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (67.172.xx.xx) on Thu 6 Oct 2005 at 06:37
As already mentioned, it is usually because dhclient is still running. I have had many a student get stuck in this loop by booting their machine with dhcp (thus dhclient starts) and then try to change the /etc/resolv.conf file. As also mentioned, dhclient rewrites this file at lease half-life when it renews. After my students realize what is happening, they change their /etc/network/interfaces file to use static information and restart networking. HOWEVER, when they restart the network, dhclient still isn't killed, because the init script sees that it is using a static address and doesn't know it needs to shutdown dhclient. If you were trying both dhcp and static settings, this could have been your problem.

The proper way to change from dhcp to static, is to shutdown networking with "/etc/inti.d/networking stop" (or "ifdown eth0"), make your changes in /etc/network/interfaces from dhcp to static, and then bring back up the network with "/etc/init.d/networking start" (or "ifup eth0"). And it sure doesn't hurt to do a "ps aux | grep dhclient" before you make the change to make sure dhclient is really dead.

Hope this helps someone, as I know a good number of my students have pulled out some hair with this one.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (68.146.xx.xx) on Mon 28 Sep 2009 at 15:26
Thank you Anonymous, this small slice of information really helped me out.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (130.209.xx.xx) on Thu 3 Nov 2005 at 13:16
change (or add) the "dns-nameservers" line in /etc/network/interfaces, and install the resolvconf package.

-duncan

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by rpetre (83.166.xx.xx) on Wed 28 Sep 2005 at 19:28
Very nice article. I should point out that in /usr/share/doc/ifupdown/examples there are a few more advanced tricks (like network detection for laptops or prevention of accidental network card swapping)

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by dkg (216.254.xx.xx) on Sat 1 Oct 2005 at 17:57
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i'd like to also mention ifrename in this discussion. This tool is especially useful if you are building a machine with multiple network interfaces (like a router, or a laptop with both wired and wireless NICs).

For a two-interface machine without ifrename, which network interface gets "eth0" and which one gets "eth1" is determined by which module is loaded first (if they rely on different kernel modules) or by some other arbitrary method (if they rely on the same kernel module). This can get especially dicey during a kernel upgrade or a hotplug upgrade because you don't know for sure which /etc/network/interfaces stanza is going to apply to which NIC.

ifrename lets you specify (in /etc/iftab) what the actual interface should be named based on some set of matching criteria (such as the MAC address, which is built into the adapter itself). Here's an example /etc/iftab for a laptop to make sure that the wired and wireless NICs are always bound to the same name:

#/etc/iftab for a laptop with two NICs
wired mac AB:CD:EF:01:02:03
wireless mac 45:67:89:0A:0B:0C
When writing your own /etc/iftab, you'll need to see what the actual mac addresses are for your current arrangement. You can do this easily with: /sbin/ifconfig -a | grep HWaddr

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Sat 1 Oct 2005 at 19:05
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Damn, I was saving that for a seperate article!

Oh well, definitely a good tip. Thanks for adding it here.

Steve
--

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (62.56.xx.xx) on Mon 3 Oct 2005 at 20:49
Hi - lots of useful info but I need one more step! If I've two Debian boxes connected by ethernet and they can ping each other, what do I do next in order to share files etc?

I'm particularly interested in the case when one of the boxes has *only* the netinst stuff on it (ie how to bring it to a full Debian via files on another 'full' Debian box)

Ta, Michael

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Mon 3 Oct 2005 at 20:57
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You could use scp if you have openssh installed on both machines - or for more general purpose sharing you could install an FTP server, Samba server, or NFS server.

Using scp to transfer files is probably sufficient ..

You have lots of options and without more details about the kind of sharing you wish to do it is hard to know what to say!

Steve
--

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by mkb (62.56.xx.xx) on Mon 3 Oct 2005 at 22:46
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The netinst doesn't seem to have either ftp nor ssh so the nearest I can see is telnet but I can't see how to use that to transfer files...

I wish to get files such as sudo & ssh deb packages onto the 2nd computer - currently resorting to booting both into XP to do this! ie how to get files from one to the other in the first instance (so can install apps such as those you list). Once done that I'll finally set up the server as an apt repository for the latter

Ta, Michael

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Mon 3 Oct 2005 at 22:49
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Telnet won't help you much.

At the point you installed presumably you had network access - so if you still have that you should be able to install the openssh package. If your network isn't working properly then you could look elsewhere for help getting it working ..

I guess you could save the openssh*.deb files onto floppy from the XP side, but that might be a bit paintful!

Steve
--

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by mkb (62.56.xx.xx) on Mon 3 Oct 2005 at 23:01
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I cut the netinst from another machine.
I think I should be able to use NFS between the two I have here... now trying that

ta,M

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (24.251.xx.xx) on Tue 4 Oct 2005 at 20:45
You stopped one explination too early. You went though how to set up default and special routes but stoped before explaining if there is a Debian way of setting up persistant static routes? Something like /etc/network/routes or smoething.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Tue 4 Oct 2005 at 20:49
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There isn't anything specific in place for doing that.

However you can cause scripts / commands to be executed as interfaces are brought up - either by adding them to /etc/network/interfaces, or by placing them in /etc/network/if-up.d.

For an example of the former approach you can see this snippet:

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
     address 192.168.1.42
     network 192.168.1.0
     netmask 255.255.255.128
     broadcast 192.168.1.0
     up route add -net 192.168.1.128 netmask 255.255.255.128 gw 192.168.1.2
     up route add default gw 192.168.1.200
     down route del default gw 192.168.1.200
     down route del -net 192.168.1.128 netmask 255.255.255.128 gw 192.168.1.2

I hope that helps!

Steve
--

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (64.36.xx.xx) on Wed 5 Oct 2005 at 04:01
Two things,
1) How do you specify a fully qualified domain name? Is that merely a by-product of /etc/hosts?
2) Just a point of information, multiple search'es can be specified to search multiple domains, but unlike nameservers they must all be declared on the same line. I've seen this problem crop up many times, often any error (multiple search lines) makes NO searching work-- big problem.

Thanks for the great article, I'll make sure to add it to my welcome to debian kit.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (67.172.xx.xx) on Thu 6 Oct 2005 at 06:20
Yes, FQDNs are a by-product of the /etc/hosts. The trick is to put your FQDN as the first entry after the IP address (either static or loopback), and before all the aliases.

And for those who don't know, if you are running a DCHP server and want your linux clients to have a search stanza for the domain, simply have the DHCP server hand out the domain name. The effect on a Debian Sarge client is to add the domain's appropriate search stanza to the /etc/resolve.conf file before the nameserver entries.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (68.97.xx.xx) on Tue 25 Oct 2005 at 01:54
ok, what should that look like?

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by sjpwong (59.167.xx.xx) on Fri 20 Jul 2007 at 04:58
Thanks so much for this tip.

You don't know how long I've been annoyed by Apache telling me "apache2: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.0.1 for ServerName".

Now that message is gone forever :-)

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (130.161.xx.xx) on Fri 7 Oct 2005 at 15:38
Users looking for more information on configuring networking the Debian way can consult the Networking chapter of the Debian Reference.

The author of this article would surely be welcome to help with the maintenance of the Debian Reference. ;)

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (62.212.xx.xx) on Tue 11 Oct 2005 at 22:11
Using a hard-coded network interface name is a bad idea. This simply does not work on a Mac with the latest kernels. The solution: something like

auto eth0 eth1

mapping eth*
script /usr/local/sbin/map-scheme

iface eth inet static
...

where /usr/local/sbin/map-scheme contains:

mac=$(/sbin/ifconfig "$1" | \
sed -n '/^.*HWaddr \([:[:xdigit:]]*\).*/{s//\1/;y/abcdef/ABCDEF/;p;q;}')
test "$mac" = XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
echo eth

where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is the MAC address.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (61.95.xx.xx) on Sat 15 Oct 2005 at 21:06
Hello Friends,
Although it is debian article i would like to ask my question because after all it is based on debian. I have installed ubuntu 5.4 on my P-3 650MHZ PC on second hard disk's 4th partition which is 40 GB today.After installtion is completed when i log in to windows 2000, I found that all my partitions on second drive have gone. Can I retrieve all my data? Is there any solution to my problem? why ubuntu arase all partitions on my second drive?
Please help me.
Thank you

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (82.41.xx.xx) on Sun 16 Oct 2005 at 13:20

You'd be better off asking on an Ubuntu mailing list. Ubuntu is not Debian, and you've not provided enough details for anybody to help..

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (61.95.xx.xx) on Mon 17 Oct 2005 at 16:52
Hi,
My problem regarding disappearing disks has been solved by logged into rescue mode. But still my Grub boot loader is not installed correctly.
My system settings are:
Machine name: HP-BRIO
Operating System: Windows 2000 Professional (5.0, Build 2195) Service Pack 4
Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
System Manufacturer: Hewlett-Packard
System Model: HP Brio
BIOS: Default System BIOS
Processor: Intel Pentium III, ~650MHz
Memory: 192MB RAM
Page File: 79MB used, 379MB available
Windows Dir: C:\WINNT

I have Two Hard disks. On Fist one I installed win-2000 and on second 40GB, which was partitioned as four parts D(6GB), E(6GB), F(6GB), and G (22GB). I have installed RedHat-9 (now it is Ubuntu 5.4) on G drive. My Bios can read only unto 33GB. That is why Red Hat leave 8GB space as not-usable and installed the Base system on usable(I mean BIOS readable) space.
If you are thinking why I am saying all this? When I installed Ubuntu It took all space!
Is it possible to access all the space?
I reinstalled Ubuntu in hdd3 and installed grub boot loader on root partition (Linux root hdd3) and with the command #
dd if=/dev/hdd3 of=/bootsect.lnx bs=512 count=1
created bootsect.lnx . Then copy bootsect.lnx file to C:\ for start up screen to change OS. When I reboot and try to login to Linux Grub say gnome error. Should I choose MBR option to install grub? Hope you got my problem (I follow this procedure in red hat. It works well).

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (130.243.xx.xx) on Fri 11 Nov 2005 at 20:04
This thread is about network, not installing bootloaders. (I have no problem with Ubuntu, becouse it's still Debian bases).
So please place question in propper place.
1) A tread discussing bootloaders.
2) A Umbuntu place (becouse you get better help, if there are differences between the two distributions)

BUT, you should NOT do "dd ..." to install bootloader. If it works in another distributions doesn't mean it works in same way in Debian (and other way around).
Do "dpkg-reconfigure -plow grub" OR manualy edit /boot/grub/meny.list and reinstall boot loader (see grub documentation at /usr/share/doc/grub or man pages).

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (86.132.xx.xx) on Mon 24 Oct 2005 at 00:48
It is so petty, really!

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (85.187.xx.xx) on Thu 4 May 2006 at 10:07
Very useful. Thanks!

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (24.229.xx.xx) on Tue 25 Jul 2006 at 08:05
thank you very much! exactly what I needed. Linux newbie here.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (69.237.xx.xx) on Tue 15 Apr 2008 at 02:03
The information everyone has given on this page is extremely helpful! I did
#cat /etc/resolv.conf
and was greeted with "DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE BY HAND -- YOUR CHANGES WILL BE OVERWRITTEN". So I didn't know where to add nameserver information. But this page made me aware of the resolvconf package and its files. Boy, what a lifesaver because I was getting "ping: host not found" errors. Thanks to everyone here!

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (85.72.xx.xx) on Sat 25 Jul 2009 at 12:17
SIOCADDRT: No such process

(When trying to perfom "/sbin/..." )

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by doug (64.123.xx.xx) on Mon 19 Jul 2010 at 21:36

We're trying to add a Debian computer to a small office network. We can ping the other computers but cannot ping outside the LAN. The Windows computers can ping outside the LAN. Any suggestions? Thanks

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (121.44.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Jul 2010 at 12:22
It depends on your exact network setup, but I would guess that the default route for the debian machine is not set correctly.

Compare deb:"traceroute debian.org" win:"tracert debian.org".

The first hop should/will be the gateway - i.e. the connection to the internet.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by spirals (86.46.xx.xx) on Fri 1 Oct 2010 at 23:11
I disabled dhcdld by commenting within the script in init.d for dhcdld the path to the binary in sbin while hunting for rouge processes.My problem is that I have processes within Debian trying to talk to an number of sites including one in Russia. They are blocked by my firewall (Guarddog) by putting the target IPs in a zone with zero connections. Now I want to discover which processes are doing the sending. After disabling dhcdld permanently I cleaned messages and rebooted. I can still see as soon as protocol 10 (INET) is configured repeat entries for dropped and failed messages to 82.94.231.195,83.91.86.29,85.17.59.187,78.111.92.195, 95.211.24.112, 70.56.229.133, 149.9.0.58, 149.9.0.59, 224.0.0.22,224.0.0.251, 94.23.17.54,189.169.29.56,224.0.0.1. (all in Zone KILL) Any help/ suggestion please as I do not wish to do a complete machine software rebuild but rather need to find the offending process and remove permanently and my skills are a bit rust . thank you in advance.

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (196.215.xx.xx) on Mon 26 Dec 2011 at 18:29
this is pretty cool straight forward

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (114.79.xx.xx) on Tue 27 Dec 2011 at 02:34
i've ppp connection, i try to change my dns through /etc/network/interfaces and /etc/resolv.conf, strangely dns won't change, then i edit /etc/ppp/peers/wvdial and /etc/ppp/peers/provider then uncomment line usepeerdns, f*** me thats the problem but i dont know maybe just coincident or luck lol

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