Building your own v2.6.x Kernel in the Debian manner.

Posted by nevermind on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 13:05

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We've covered building a 2.6 Kernel before in the Debian manner, but here's another introduction in case you missed the last one.

Building a 2.6 Kernel on Debian is rather easy, first we need the kernel sourceto apply this, we run the following command:

aptitude -f install kernel-source-2.6.8

This will fetch the kernel source and all needed tools to compile and configure it from debian.

Next we need to unpack the kernel:

cd /usr/src
tar xvfj kernel-source-2.6.8.tar.bz2

This will create a directory called "kernel-source-2.6.8" under /usr/src.

Once the source code is unpackaged we can call the kernel configuration menu:

cd /usr/src/kernel-source-2.6.8/
make menuconfig

(If you receive some an error message rather than a build menu you should run "apt-get install libncurses5-dev").

Now we rather than make sure we've matched our kernel configuration with the correct options we can cheat - and take the kernel configuration file from the currently installed version of the kernel. This is done by using the menu to choose "Load an Alternate Configuration File".

The default 2.6 kernel configuration file of the kernel image that comes with Debian Sarge may be found in the directory "/boot".

Simply load the file "config-2.6.8-*-*", where the first "*" stands for the Debian subversion of the kernel, and the second "*" names your system architecture.

(To find out which kernel you are currently running you can run "uname -a").

If you dont want to change anything on the kernel, but just build your own, you may now exit the configuration menu.

When selecting Exit from the build menu you will be asked to confirm your changes. Ensure you select "yes", or they will be lost.

Now we are going to take a look on the debian specific make command for kernel rebuilds, called "make-kpkg".

make-kpkg is a rather simple program, that takes a few arguments, the most important arguments for our use are:

  • --revision number
    • This lets us give our kernel a special name which ensures our kernel doesn't "clash" with another one.
  • --initrd
    • This cuases the build to create an initrd image. This is needed if you compiled your kernel with initrd support which is Debian's default.

To proceed further we need to choose which kind of compilation we wish to persue:

Do we want to build the whole package? Just the kernel image? The modules Or just a package containing the headers?

A full list of supported targets can be viewed via the --targets option for make-kpkg.

To just build the kernel image and all that is needed for running the kernel and compile custom modules (e.g. nvidia) into it, we issue the following commands:

make-kpkg --initrd --revision examplerev01 kernel_image

During the build make-kpkg will ask you the following question:

Warning: You are using the initrd option, that may not
work, depending on your kernel version and architecture,
unless you have applied the initrd cramfs patch to
the kernel, or modified mkinitrd not to use cramfs by
default. The  cramfs initrd patch, is included in the 
Debian supplied kernel sources. New kernels on most
architectures do work fine.
By default, I assume you know what you are doing, and I
apologize for being so annoying. Should I abort[Ny]?

We can safely answer that question with "N", as we do know what we are doing;)

The compilation will take a while, bout 35 minutes on my 1.2ghz AMD Duron, so go and get yourself some air/coffee/cigarette, and listen to some of your favorite tunes. (If you wish to speed up multiple rebuilds you could look at using ccache, or distcc to build across multiple hosts - if you have more than one machine available to you).

When it finishes we can also conitinue to build a matching kernel-headers package - this is needed if you wish to build some custom kernel modules, such as Nvidia drivers, or the gmail filesystem.

make-kpkg --initrd --revision examplerev01 kernel_headers

That command should complete reasonably quickly, as its just packing the headers, that were already built by the first command.

The results of our build steps will be two files in our /usr/src directory, so lets go back to that directory, and look:

kernel-headers-2.6.8_2.6.8-3examplerev01_i386.deb
kernel-image-2.6.8_2.6.8-3examplerev01_i386.deb

To install the packages we can use dpkg:

dpkg -i kernel-image-2.6.8_2.6.8-3examplerev01_i386.deb

Answer the questions it asks you with "Yes".

dpkg -i kernel-headers-2.6.8_2.6.8-3examplerev01_i386.deb

To initialize the initrd image we can run:

mkinitrd /boot/config-2.6.8 2.6.8

Thats it. Now all we need to do is to add our new kernel to our bootmanager, in my case lilo. Open /etc/lilo.conf in your favorite text editor, and add something like this to the menu, in case its not already there:

image=/vmlinuz
initrd=/initrd.img
        label=Linux
        read-only
        optional

(The new kernel installs itself into /boot directory, and will change the symbolic links in / - so that we can refer to it as /vmlinuz, with the old kernel being refered to as /vmlinuz.old.)

Once you've updated your configuration run "lilo -v" to make it active, and reboot your machine.

 

 


Posted by Anonymous (82.119.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 14:55
What is the problem with cramfs? I installed 2.6.12.2 kernel on sarge with cramfs and initrd without problems. And what is advantage over "make deb-pkg" in kernel tree?

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Posted by nevermind (62.218.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 15:16
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i dont see a problem with using a kernel from kernel.org, or with the use of cramfs.

i was just referring to the "debian" way... or better said "ways..." as you pointed out with make deb-pkg another methode. (debian way cause -> debian-administration.org...)

this just shows that you have multiple possibilities with building a kernel on a debian system.

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Posted by bell (80.202.xx.xx) on Fri 12 Aug 2005 at 21:28
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Is it OK to use a kernel from kernel.org (i.e. 2.6.12-4) in stead of the 2.6.8 from sarge? I still haven't managed to grasp what the specific debian-patches does, and wether they are necessary or not. If they are, how do I incorporate them into the 2.6.12-4 kernel?

Or is the best route to go with the kernel from unstable (2.6.12-2) Or is that a definite no-no?

All help is greatly appreciated! :)

(The reason I need the latest kernel is better support for a Promise S-ATA controller card.)

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (194.251.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 15:27
Thanks for the article. A year (or two...) ago I compiled the 2.4 kernel, alsa and I2C add-on modules, but I've forgotten how I did it and now I'd like to upgrade to 2.6.

Instead of using the deprecated root + /usr/src location, you can as easily build the kernel package as normal user with fakeroot. There is no magic in compiling kernel in /usr/src anymore.

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Posted by nevermind (62.218.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 21:37
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i know the fakeroot concept from building java .deb's and making your own customized deb's, i just havent associated it with kernel builds, thx for the heads up=)

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Posted by Steve (82.41.xx.xx) on Thu 4 Aug 2005 at 12:55
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Bear in mind that to write to /usr/src/ you will need to be a member of the src group.

(This isn't an issue if you place the source code elsewhere)

Steve
-- Steve.org.uk

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Posted by Anonymous (67.9.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 16:51
Thank you evermind, for the easy to understand article. I need to be spoonfed, and you have done a great job
Ray

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Posted by Anonymous (24.16.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 18:58
A few additions/corrections:

1. I believe that the package required for menuconfig is libncurses5-dev.

2. As of kernel version 2.6.12 (in Sid right now) the package name has been changed to linux-source and linux-image, a more sane name given the other kernels Debian supports.

3. Using grub, as is default these days, all you need to do to add a freshly installed kernel to your /boot/grub/menu.lst is to run the command `update-grub` as root.

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Posted by nevermind (62.218.xx.xx) on Wed 3 Aug 2005 at 21:34
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< 1. I believe that the package required for menuconfig is libncurses5-dev.

yes, youre right, thanks for the information, i forgot the exact package name, since i had it already installed with my first 2.4 compile (some years ago...)

thx for the other addings, i think thats a good thing to add to this article.

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Posted by Anonymous (193.124.xx.xx) on Thu 4 Aug 2005 at 10:25
Also please correct typo "vmlinuz.org" to correct "vmlinuz.old".

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Posted by dym (213.186.xx.xx) on Thu 4 Aug 2005 at 06:33
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On my linux there was no need in running mkinitrd, coz `dpkg` ran it by itself.

Btw i'm using grub instead of lilo, so dpkg also added new kernel to menu.lst.

After kernel installation all that i needed was `reboot` :)

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Posted by toyg (195.212.xx.xx) on Thu 4 Aug 2005 at 10:33
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Is a 2.6 kernel source included in the standard Sarge release?
I installed 3.1 from the LinuxMagazine DVD, that AFAIK should have been pretty comprehensive, on an offline machine. Then I looked for the kernel sources with apt-cache, but I couldn't find them. One would think that 4GB were enough to include less than 40mb of sources, especially considering that other modules' sources (pcmcia_cs, hostap, etc.) are there. Did LM b0rk their DVD (if yes, I'm going to complain with them), or the sources really are not there?

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Posted by nevermind (62.218.xx.xx) on Thu 4 Aug 2005 at 16:11
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i dont know about the debian dvd, i usually use the online mirrors from debian.org

the kernel source package name is kernel-source-2.6.8

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Posted by kecsi (195.56.xx.xx) on Thu 4 Aug 2005 at 11:11
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    Just some tips more:
  • I used to create a link to my source: ln -s kernel-source-2.6.11 linux
  • you can collect more packages which are necessary for kernel build e.g.: apt-get install gcc bin86 libc6-dev bzip2 kernel-package kernel-patch-mppe kernel-source-2.6.10 tk8.3 libncurses5-dev fakeroot kernel-patch-mppe kernel-patch-bootsplash bootsplash bootsplash-theme-tuxinfo-debian
  • you can include in this article the debian way of kernel patching :)
    cd /usr/src/linux
    /usr/src/kernel-patches/all/apply/bootsplash
    /usr/src/kernel-patches/all/apply/mppe

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Posted by Anonymous (130.243.xx.xx) on Tue 9 Aug 2005 at 22:36
You do not need to build a new kernel to make new modules to load. Take a look at module-assistant. It downloads packages with module source automaticly Keeps track of packages. Handles multiple kernel versions builds to.

So to build unionfs-module first time with module-assistant just do:

su
apt-get -u install module-assistant
module-assistant prepare # when new kernel
module-assistant get unionfs
module-assistant build unionfs
module-assistant install unionfs
module-assistant clean

Now unionfs source is downloaded, compiled with your current kernel and installed. Yeh, you can use m-a instead of module-assistant if you don't remember how it's spelled (like me ;-).

And if sudo has been set up propperly, do this as normal user
m-a -u ~/build a-i unionfs # does what you see above.
m-a -u ~/build clean

(Sorry for errors, it's from memory)

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Posted by smsiebe (210.207.xx.xx) on Sun 14 Aug 2005 at 11:22
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Great article! Last time I upgraded a Kernel was 2.2 to 2.4 back in college and this really sparked my memory. Now stationed in Korea with my own computer (my wife doesn't have to use it too), I'm back on Linux. I recently did a fresh Sarge (2.4) install (last night, about 1:30am) and want to upgrade to 2.6. I followed your directions only vectoring off a couple times to get some packages that weren't installed. I'm having trouble booting, however.

I'm using GRUB as my boot loader, this is my config in menu.lst:

---------------
title Debian GNU/Linux, kernel 2.6.12.4
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.12.4 root=/dev/hdc8 ro
initrd /initrd.img-2.6.12.4
savedefault
boot

title Debian GNU/Linux, kernel 2.4.27-2-386
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.27-2-386 root=/dev/hdc8 ro
initrd /initrd.img-2.4.27-2-386
savedefault
boot

-----------------

I 'customized' the kernel but I am pretty sure I didn't leave out anything that would cause the following error. I am getting this error about 7 seconds into boot:VFS: Cannot open root device "hdc8" or unknown-block(0,0)
Please append a correct "root=" boot option
Kernel panic - not syncing:VFS:Unable to mount root FS on unknown-block(0,0)

As you can see the config in menu.lst is the same for my 2.4 and 2.6 kernels. I can still boot to my 2.4 kernel, thankfully, so I'm confused as to why the error is stating that hdc8 is not the correct root device. I'm assuming hdc8 (/dev/hdc8) is my / partition. Funny, though, because my drive is SATA..shouldn't it be /dev/sda* ?

I appreciate any help I can get. This one has me lost. I may install Lilo so I can work with something I am familiar with.

Thanks,

Steve


SGT Steven Siebert
US Army

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Posted by PaulePanter (84.190.xx.xx) on Tue 16 Aug 2005 at 14:10
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Hi,

I had the same problem updating from 2.4 to 2.6 .

I think in 2.6 they included libata which treats S-ATA devices like SCSI, that means /dev/sd* . So you should change that in menu.lst. But doing this you have a problem with /etc/fstab since there all entries are in IDE-style.

In my situation I set up a new Sarge-Installation with the boot option linux26 or kernel26 (just hit F2 to find out) and the kernel was used from the beginning.

What you can also try is to migrate is to use a newer 2.4 kernel, since I think 2.4.28 or higher has also the new libata lib, that treats S-ATA as SCSI -- if you still want to use 2.4 for any reason. So you could upgrade to >2.4.27, change your /etc/fstab and if it works then upgrade to 2.6 .

I hope that helps (please report back).

PaulePanter

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Posted by southerncross (82.123.xx.xx) on Thu 18 Aug 2005 at 10:10
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I followed the process but at some point I have some weird results. After having used make-kpkg for building the kernel image, the .deb wasn't built; a .deb was built however for the kernel headers. Browsing through the output of the make-kpkg for the kernel image I noticed at the last lines two lines of error messages related to a "stamp" something.
Any idea of what it could be?
Thanks!
Charles.

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Posted by Anonymous (210.207.xx.xx) on Thu 18 Aug 2005 at 21:34
Hello again,

Well, at least I have learned a lot over the last week. Not much sleep, but there is always a trade-off.

So, right, big difference between 2.4 and 2.6. The use of libata keeps me from needed to use SCSI emulation, like you say, so I would need to change everything to sd*. I have no problem doing this is grub but I worry that if I make the changes to fstab that I will not be able to boot even in 2.4 if that was the wrong move. Since this is my only computer and only OS on this thing, I don't want to risk not being able to boot. Any thoughts on that?

I tried, oh how I tried, to do a linux26 install. But for some reason it would not recognize my SATA controller! Even after I took out my SATA CD-RW and put in an IDE DVD-ROM, the install screen errored out saying it could not find a CDROM drive (even though I was booting from it!) So, anyway, I was forced to do the 2.4 install because it didn't have the same problems.

I reconfigured my kernel for the millionth time, all of my hardware should be completly supported (with no extra stuff) with this new 2.6 kernel. I have the initrd image, which gave me a couple modprobe errors for modules I don't need in this next revision (so I'm not worried about them). My grub is all setup and I am ready to modify my fstab if somebody can reassure me that I will be able to boot back into the system if I was wrong.

Any advice would be appreciate!

Thanks,

Steve

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Posted by PaulePanter (84.190.xx.xx) on Fri 19 Aug 2005 at 07:51
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Hi Steve,

there is always some risk. But a more or less foolproof way should be something like this:

1. Download a Live-CD (Knoppix (knopper.net), or anything else)
2. Boot from this Live-CD.
3. Mount your the partition, where /etc/fstab is located.
4. Make a copy (cp /mnt/*part*/etc/fstab /mnt/*part*/etc/fstab.bck)
5. Change the entries in /mnt/*part*/etc/fstab .
6. Reboot with your 2.6 linux kernel.

If it did not work:

Follow steps 2. and 3. and then rename the fstab.bck to fstab. The 2.4 kernel should work then as before.

I hope that helps
PaulePanter

PS:
1. Take a look at http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/debian-installer/ . Your problem installing with a 2.6 kernel is a known issue. Maybe the workaround works with your computer.

2. You can also check, if 2.6 works with your computer, if you boot knoppix with a 2.6 kernel. I think normally it uses 2.4, and you can change that with knoppix26 at the boot prompt.

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Posted by bisi (206.70.xx.xx) on Fri 19 Aug 2005 at 17:00
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I install kernel 2.6.8 from the kernel image shipped with sarge using apt-get install kernel-image-2.6.8-2-686.

The installation went successfully and I was able to boot the server with no problem. However, now I cannot mount the cdrom. When I try to mount the cdrom device using mount /media/cdrom0 I get the following error:

mount: special device /dev/hda does not exist

The following is the entry in my /etc/fstab:
#
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
/dev/sda3 / ext3 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
/dev/sda1 /boot ext3 defaults 0 2
/dev/sda5 /home ext3 defaults 0 2
/dev/sda6 /usr ext3 defaults 0 2
/dev/sda2 /var ext3 defaults 0 2
/dev/sda7 none swap sw 0 0
/dev/hda /media/cdrom0 iso9660 ro,user,noauto 0 0
/dev/fd0 /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0

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Posted by PaulePanter (84.190.xx.xx) on Sat 20 Aug 2005 at 08:22
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Hi,

I do not know, what went wrong. But maybe the device-names changed. Take a look at the boot-messages with dmesg and look for the line, where your CD-drive gets initialized. There you should also see the device name.

Hope that helps.
PaulePanter

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Posted by bisi (69.248.xx.xx) on Sat 20 Aug 2005 at 14:33
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In /var/log/kern.log before the upgrade (kernel 2.4.27-2-386) this is the entry I found for the devices:

Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Attached scsi disk sda at scsi2, channel 0, id 0, lun 0
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: SCSI device sda: 213288960 512-byte hdwr sectors (109204 MB)
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Partition check:
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: /dev/scsi/host2/bus0/target0/lun0: p1 p2 p3 p4 < p5 p6 p7 >
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Journalled Block Device driver loaded
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Adding Swap: 2096220k swap-space (priority -1)
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: EXT3 FS 2.4-0.9.19, 19 August 2002 on sd(8,3), internal journal
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Uniform Multi-Platform E-IDE driver Revision: 7.00beta4-2.4
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: ide: Assuming 33MHz system bus speed for PIO modes; override with idebus=xx

Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: hda: LTN485S, ATAPI CD/DVD-ROM drive
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: ide0 at 0x1f0-0x1f7,0x3f6 on irq 14
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: hda: attached ide-cdrom driver.
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: hda: ATAPI 48X CD-ROM drive, 120kB Cache
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Uniform CD-ROM driver Revision: 3.12

However, after the upgrade to 2.6.8-2-686 this is the entry for the devices without any information aboot the cdrom device:

Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: SCSI device sda: 213288960 512-byte hdwr sectors (109204 MB)
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: SCSI device sda: drive cache: write through
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: /dev/scsi/host2/bus0/target0/lun0: p1 p2 p3 p4 < p5 p6 p7 >
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: Attached scsi disk sda at scsi2, channel 0, id 0, lun 0
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: Adding 2096220k swap on /dev/sda7. Priority:-1 extents:1
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: EXT3 FS on sda3, internal journal
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: Uniform Multi-Platform E-IDE driver Revision: 7.00alpha2
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: ide: Assuming 33MHz system bus speed for PIO modes; override with idebus=xx

It appears to me that kernel 2.6.8-2-686 does not recognized the cdrom device. Could this be a bug?

Any help to resolve this will be appreciated.

Bisi

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Posted by bisi (69.248.xx.xx) on Sat 20 Aug 2005 at 18:12
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In /var/log/kern.log before the upgrade (kernel 2.4.27-2-386) this is the entry I found for the devices:

Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Attached scsi disk sda at scsi2, channel 0, id 0, lun 0
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: SCSI device sda: 213288960 512-byte hdwr sectors (109204 MB)
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Partition check:
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: /dev/scsi/host2/bus0/target0/lun0: p1 p2 p3 p4 < p5 p6 p7 >
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Journalled Block Device driver loaded
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Adding Swap: 2096220k swap-space (priority -1)
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: EXT3 FS 2.4-0.9.19, 19 August 2002 on sd(8,3), internal journal
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Uniform Multi-Platform E-IDE driver Revision: 7.00beta4-2.4
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: ide: Assuming 33MHz system bus speed for PIO modes; override with idebus=xx

Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: hda: LTN485S, ATAPI CD/DVD-ROM drive
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: ide0 at 0x1f0-0x1f7,0x3f6 on irq 14
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: hda: attached ide-cdrom driver.
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: hda: ATAPI 48X CD-ROM drive, 120kB Cache
Aug 14 22:23:33 oroki kernel: Uniform CD-ROM driver Revision: 3.12

However, after the upgrade to 2.6.8-2-686 this is the entry for the devices without any information aboot the cdrom device:

Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: SCSI device sda: 213288960 512-byte hdwr sectors (109204 MB)
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: SCSI device sda: drive cache: write through
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: /dev/scsi/host2/bus0/target0/lun0: p1 p2 p3 p4 < p5 p6 p7 >
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: Attached scsi disk sda at scsi2, channel 0, id 0, lun 0
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: kjournald starting. Commit interval 5 seconds
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: EXT3-fs: mounted filesystem with ordered data mode.
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: Adding 2096220k swap on /dev/sda7. Priority:-1 extents:1
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: EXT3 FS on sda3, internal journal
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: Uniform Multi-Platform E-IDE driver Revision: 7.00alpha2
Aug 19 03:44:33 oroki kernel: ide: Assuming 33MHz system bus speed for PIO modes; override with idebus=xx

It appears to me that kernel 2.6.8-2-686 does not recognized the cdrom device. Could this be a bug?

Any help to resolve this will be appreciated.

Bisi

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Posted by PaulePanter (84.190.xx.xx) on Mon 22 Aug 2005 at 11:53
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It looks like you are not the only one experiencing this problem. Take a look at

http://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=296762

Please report back, if that helped.

PaulePanter

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (206.70.xx.xx) on Mon 22 Aug 2005 at 19:18
The solution provided from the link below resolved the cdrom device recognition problem:

http://kerneltrap.org/node/3971#comment-12554 :

echo ide-generic >>/etc/mkinitrd/modules
echo ata_piix >>/etc/mkinitrd/modules
echo sd_mod >>/etc/mkinitrd/modules

cp /boot/initrd.img-2.6.8-2-386 /boot/initrd.img-2.6.8-2-386.bak
mkinitrd -o /boot/initrd.img-2.6.8-2-386
shutdown -r now

Now I can mount the cdrom.

Thanks for all your help.

Bisi

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (129.6.xx.xx) on Tue 13 Sep 2005 at 14:17
Your mkinitrd command has a typo:

mkinitrd /boot/config-2.6.8 2.6.8

should be

mkinitrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.8 2.6.8

[ Parent | Reply to this comment ]

Posted by Anonymous (67.163.xx.xx) on Sat 1 Oct 2005 at 16:40
It should probably be mentioned that it's a good idea to run make-kpkg clean before compiling the kernel.

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